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The state of the parties so far

Ugly Truth Thailand - October 7, 2018

Giles Ji Ungpakorn At present the presumed date for the future Thai elections is sometime in February 2019 and various political parties are going through the process of registering with the Electoral Commission and holding meetings to elect people to leadership posts. However, political parties have been warned by the junta not to declare their manifestos or to start the process of electioneering.

There are a number of parties worth a mention on the anti-military side.

The "Future Forward Party" has a clear policy of reducing the power and influence of the military by scrapping the military constitution and other junta inspired laws, and it is busy pushing its "new look" and claiming to be the party of the new generation. However, it is likely to be a party aimed at sections of the pro-democracy middle classes. It will prioritise the free-market and business interests while also claiming to support the poor in an abstract manner. Its leader, tycoon Thanathorn Juangroongruangkit, has stated that it will "protect capitalism for the benefit of the majority". In the past he has emphasised that business must make a profit before benefits for workers can be improved. It is in favour of devolving power to the provinces and has made sounds about self-determination in Patani. [See https://bit.ly/2Nf7fks and https://bit.ly/2IpUUJa].

Without an extra-parliamentary mass movement for democracy it will be difficult for any elected party to reduce the role of the military. [See https://bit.ly/2O5ZNNx].

The "Commoners Party" claims to be a grass-roots party with no big-business backing and it is made up of NGO activists and villagers. It also has a position against the military's involvement in politics, but so far its policies remain vague. It has recently been involved in a scandal when it was revealed that the elected deputy leader, Akechai Isarata, took part in the anti-election mob in 2014 which opened the door to Prayut's coup. This stems from the NGO movement's hatred of Taksin Shinawat and their reticence about democracy and the need to oppose military coups. He has now resigned after members of the party called on him to quit.

The Taksin controlled Pua Thai Party has a long pedigree of being supported by the rural poor and urban workers, which will give it an advantage at the polls. Taksin's first party, Thai Rak Thai, brought in the first ever universal health care scheme and other pro-poor policies. But Taksin has a reputation for brutal repression in Patani and during the War on Drugs. Pua Thai also enjoys an "anti-military" image from the fact that 4 of its elected governments were overthrown, either by the military or the pro-military judiciary. Yet Taksin and most Pua Thai politicians, with handful honourable exceptions, have done nothing to oppose Prayut's military junta over the last 4 years. It is known that they would rather do a deal with the military and the reactionaries. [See https://bit.ly/2pI87Ev].

In the pro-junta reactionary corner, we have the misnamed Democrat Party, which in 2008 became the "party of the military". Abhisit Vejjajiva was appointed Prime Minister by the military and in 2010 ordered the cold-blooded shooting of unarmed pro-democracy demonstrators. The Democrats have never won a majority in any election and since the Taksin years have taken an extreme free-market position, opposing state spending on the universal health care scheme and job creation programmes. The party now pretends to oppose military coups and Prayut's continued role in politics. But it has a record of taking part in events which create the conditions for military intervention. There is currently a contest for the leader of the party. [See https://bit.ly/2IrOIAr].

Also in the reactionary corner, we have the "Action Coalition for Thailand Party" set up by Sutep Tuaksuban and his mates. The Thai name is "Ruam Palang Prachachart Thai", which means unite together the power of the Thai people. Included among founding party members are members of the Tuaksuban clan; a political mafia group who control areas of Surat Tani province in the south. They were formerly members of the Democrat Party. Sutep Tuaksuban, along with Democrat Party leader Abhisit and General Prayut, are responsible for the cold-blooded murders of Red Shirts in 2010. Sutep was also the leader of the anti-election mob which wrecked the February 2014 elections and paved the way to Prayut's military coup. [See https://bit.ly/2QjpRS5 and https://bit.ly/2zF2bSS]. Reactionary academic Anek laotamatat [https://bit.ly/2cPKRjP] and former "professional student leader" turned PAD Yellow Shirt Suriyasai Katasila, along with Sutep's lawyer, are also among the list of founding members of the Ruam Palang Prachachart Thai Party.

Sutep's "Ruam Palang Prachachart Thai Party" supports the military junta and it might well vote for Generalissimo Prayut to become the next Prime Minister. Prayut has refused to rule out extending his role in politics and the military constitution allows for a non-MP to be nominated as Prime Minister in some circumstances. However, anyone wanting to vote for the junta can now directly support the "Palang Pracharat Party" (power of the citizens party). It has been set up by Prayut's cronies and is stuff full of junta officials. Naturally, when the reactionary parties talk about "the people" they really mean the military and the elites.

Of course, we have to be absolute clear that these elections will not restore democracy to Thailand, as the political agenda is going to be tightly controlled by the military's National Strategy and their powerful appointed supporters in the senate and the judiciary. However, this system of "Guided Democracy" will be enough satisfy Western governments who have never cared about freedom and democracy in most parts of the world.

Source: https://uglytruththailand.wordpress.com/2018/10/07/the-state-of-the-parties-so-far/.

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